Not your “Ordinary” Award

 

There were many challenges in bringing this bar back to life, some of ( as you can see in the below photos) were bringing the old wooden cooler back to life, recreating some old carvings & fixing broken carved panels.  Many people don’t realize that the actual bar top is original, although mended and epoxied together in many sections, we felt as though the old top told many stories, so it was our goal to do what we could to save it and make it up to code and useable.  We stripped it down to bare wood, filled all the holes with epoxy, sanded, stained & installed a new bar rail to clean up the edge. We gave the bar top a conversion varnish finish. Although it is not the way it was done originally, we felt it would offer the most durability for the bar top itself.

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TO SEE MORE PHOTOS OF THE PROJECT, CLICK HERE

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A Little History:

The Hotel Taft became the center of New Haven’s popular social life and its proximity to the Shubert Theater and Yale University made it the destination of students, professors, tourists and actors. Some of the famous people who were guests at the Hotel Taft include presidents, actors, writers, producers, scientists and athletes. Woodrow Wilson stayed at the Taft while on his presidential campaign trail in 1912. William Howard Taft, pictured on the upper left, was known to have stayed here while he was searching for a home, while he was a Yale professor in 1914. Babe Ruth, pictured on the top center, stayed at the Taft in 1932 and was completely mobbed outside by young fans. Other notables who have visited the Taft include Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy, The Marx Brothers, Katherine Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Marlon Brando, pictured on the bottom center, Thornton Wilder, Eleanor, Roosevelt, pictured on the bottom left, Jack Dempsey, Albert Einstein, pictured on the top right, and Lou Gehrig. A number of accounts mention that Lincoln came to the New Haven House and likely was a guest here too .   CLICK HERE FOR MORE THE AMAZING FULL STORY!

Some other related links:

PRESS –

New Haven Independent – Storied Richter’s Tavern to Open New Chapter

Yale Daily News – Richter’s bar set to reopen

New Haven Independent – Caseus Chef Poised to Revive Richter’s

Chew Haven – Ordinary

New Haven Independent – An Amazing -& “Ordinary” – Powder House Day

The New Journal – Of All the Gin Joints in this Town

 

Feel free to contact us with any questions:

 

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A Tricked Out Miter Saw Cart

The mobile base carries a miter saw stand and multiple tools—including a compressor and dust extractor. The stand is a BestFence Pro 3 and the dust hood is a prototype of a new ChopShop hood. Both tools are from FastCap. On the stand is an 8 1/2-inch Hitachi slide miter saw.

The rolling base reduces the amount of time we spend walking to the saw, by making it easy to keep the cut station close to the work.

To keep the stand from sliding around, the legs drop into 2-inch rubber pipe caps screwed to the base. A plywood frame holds the dust collector in place. Note the tool bag tucked between the compressor and vac.

Cutoffs and trash go into the orange bucket—which pivots out for easy access and tucks away for transport.

My company installs millwork and trim on commercial projects, some so large we might have to walk ¼ to ½ mile inside the building to reach the place where the work is to occur. And the work might be spread out over a large area, as was the case on a recent project where we trimmed a ¼-mile long corridor in a hospital.

At the beginning of the job I realized we’d have to set up our cut station multiple times or spend a lot of time walking back and forth from wherever it was. I didn’t feel like wasting that kind of time so I built a mobile base for our miter saw stand from a sheet of plywood, some casters, and a handful of fasteners. Including design time, the base took just over two hours to build—time well spent given the countless hours we saved by keeping the cut station close to the work.

The base has five 2-inch rubber casters, two at each end and one in the middle. The back edge is stiffened by a 6-inch vertical rip of plywood. The center wheel is at the non-stiffened edge so the base can float (flex) over humps in concrete floors. Because the casters are small, they offer enough resistance that there’s no need to lock them when using the saw; the stand only moves when I want it to.

The base was made to fit FastCap’s BestFence stand—though really, it could have been designed to carry any commercial or home-made saw stand. To keep the stand in position, each of its four feet lands in a 2-inch rubber pipe cap that is screwed to the base. Between the legs we carry a small ultra-quiet compressor, dust extractor, and the safety cones the hospital requires us to use. The dust extractor is held in a cradle to keep it from rolling around and the trash can swings out on a plywood pivot for quick and easy access. With all of this stuff on the base there is still room to store a tool bag, nail guns, and other small items. We hang our hoses and cords from the BestFence handles. When it’s time to move we simply roll the base to wherever the cut station needs to be.

I’ve built this cart more than once, modifying the design to suit the job at hand. Typically, I unload at the loading dock, put everything on the base, and then roll it to the work area. If there are stairs, I won’t load the cart till I get everything to the top-at which point I’m able to roll it around the facility. The base saves us a lot of time by making it easy to keep our cut station and associated tools close to the work area. We use it in much the same way as we use our mobile tool cart.


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